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Idaho State News

Idaho, Kentucky, and Multistate Coalition Hands Significant Defeat to Biden Administration’s Green Agenda

Federal Judge Blocks Rule Targeting Gas-Powered Cars

[BOISE] — Attorney General Raúl Labrador announced Tuesday that a federal judge blocked the Biden Administration’s highway emissions rule that tried to drive gas-powered cars off the road. As part of a 21-state coalition led by Kentucky, Idaho brought a challenge in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky against the Federal Highway Administration’s rule that attempted to force states to reduce COemissions on the roads.  The complaint alleged that FHWA has overstepped its authority, and the Biden Administration has circumvented the Constitution and the sovereignty of the states.

“Idaho is one of the fastest growing states in the nation,” said Attorney General Labrador, “and our state is investing billions of dollars in critical infrastructure, including over 700 projects with the Idaho Department of Transportation that expand or improve the national highway system. Idaho citizens and businesses depend on effective and efficient surface transportation. The federal government demanding a reduction in vehicle miles traveled is ridiculous.  States simply cannot be forced to implement the policy whims of the federal government, and the Constitution is clear about this.”

If the Federal Highway Administration’s rule had not been struck down, it would have required states to set targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from on-road sources. Multiple states commented that the FHWA rule may cause the elimination of future economic development and job creation projects.  The ruling found that the FHWA rule exceeds their statutory authority, and that the rule was “arbitrary and capricious.”

Attorney General Labrador joined Kentucky Attorney General Russell Coleman in the FHWA suit alongside attorneys general from Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Read the opinion.